People who equate truth with fact are missing the point.

Value Options and the Denial of Care: Continuing the Conversation About Mental Health Care

On December 20, 2012, I wrote a post called A Little Girl in Danger: This Is America’s Health Care Crisis, in which I told you all about my friend Kirsten and her daughter, Pickles.

If you missed that post, allow me to sum up: Pickles is seriously mentally ill. She has multiple diagnoses, but the primary one is early-onset schizoaffective disorder, which has all the thought issues of schizophrenia combined with all the mood problems of bipolar in one developing brain. It is exactly as devastating as it sounds, but Pickles’s insurance company decided, unilaterally and against medical advice, that Pickles would be discharged with virtually no notice and with no aftercare provisions in place.

Except that it wasn’t exactly the insurance company that made that decision. It was ValueOptions®, a company that insurance companies and states contract to manage their mental and behavioral health care services. From ValueOptions® website:

ValueOptions is a health improvement company that serves more than 32 million individuals. On behalf of employers, health plans and government agencies, we manage innovative programs and solutions that directly address the challenges our health care system faces today. A national leader in the fields of mental and emotional wellbeing, recovery and resilience, employee assistance, and wellness, ValueOptions helps people make the difficult life changes needed to be healthier and more productive. With offices nationwide and a network of more than 130,000 provider locations, ValueOptions helps people take important steps in the right direction.

I don’t know what part of that statement includes removing an extremely ill child from necessary inpatient care when her safety is at stake. After I wrote my post, Kirsten’s and my mutual friend Chrisa Hickey of The Mindstorm started linking that post on ValueOptions® Facebook page several times every week in an attempt to provoke a response. Finally, after a month, she got a message from Tom Warburton, Vice President of Corporate Communications at ValueOptions®. You can read the entire letter and Chrisa’s response in Chrisa’s blog post Value Options Is Neither—An Open Letter to Tom Warburton, Vice President of Corporate Communications, Value Options, Inc.

The letter reads like nothing so much as a pat on the head. Warburton says, “I believe your persistence comes from a place of compassion for a story you read online… [and] now more than ever we should link arms to help move the agenda forward for mental illness,” as if this is an issue of an over-caring little woman with an over-identification problem. I snorted coffee when I read that because even if we didn’t all know each other (and indeed, depend on one another for the support that keeps us alive, parenting, and advocating day after day), nothing about this is even remotely Kumbaya for any of us. We are not in this for the glitter rainbows and little pink teddy bears, or whatever the hell Warburton is thinking. We are in this because our children’s lives depend on it.

There is no hyperbole in that statement. Our children’s lives are at risk because of their illnesses and we are not going to go away and cross our fingers and hope for the best. We don’t just fight for our own children and the children we know and love, but also for the children whose parents can’t fight; for the taxpayers whose money is wasted on programs that don’t work; and for the millions of people who continue to suffer and die with untreated or under-treated mental illness. We would love to “link arms” with companies like ValueOptions®, but a real conversation that leads to real change requires all of us to come to the table with our motives and values exposed. I strongly suspect that the motives and values of ValueOptions® have far more to do with balance sheets than with the lives of the 32 million Americans whose mental health care is “managed” by them.

Warburton also asks, “Are you sure that you have all the facts in the case you reference?”, which I can answer with an unequivocal yes. What I wrote in A Little Girl in Danger was not hearsay; Kirsten played voicemails from ValueOptions® employees for me, and I have been present during many of her calls with them. The question is not whether we have all the facts, but on which facts ValueOptions® is basing its decisions. In one phone call, a ValueOptions® representative said twice, “It’s just time for Pickles to go home,” and once, “We really feel like it’s time for her to go home.”

No, wait, let’s hit that one again: “We really feel like it’s time for her to go home.

Feel like??? Did someone draw a card? Read some tea leaves? Have a dream? “Feeling like” a given course of action is the right one is not medical judgment, especially when that feeling comes from people who have never met or treated Pickles.

ValueOptions®  is a private company, so their financial information is not easy to find*, but we do know a few things: the average salary of their employees is $83,000 per year. Here is a list of salaries for some of their mid-level employees, which seem pretty healthy to me for a company whose representative said, “We believe it is our job to make sure that we manage resources in the most effective manner for those that need. And as I am sure you are aware, funding for mental health treatment is dramatically underserved in both the private and public sector, so resources are scarce indeed. Our goal is to advocate for more spending – public or private – when it comes to mental health and substance abuse treatment.” It’s awfully disingenuous for a company to cry poor when their employee compensation is so generous. And remember, those are mid-level employees. Their executive leadership probably earn many times more than their average employees.

So to Warburton I say yes, absolutely. We need dramatically increased funding for mental health care in the US. On that point we agree. My concern, though, is that funding be used to treat patients, not provide ever-nicer lives to the executives of companies like ValueOptions®. Records obtained under the Freedom of Information Act indicate that in Illinois,ValueOptions® has been steadily and dramatically decreasing the number of children it approves for residential treatment, in spite of increasing need. Keep an eye on Chrisa’s blog for more information about that.

We have two urgent issues to deal with: first, we’re talking here about people. People with serious mental illness might be weird and scary. Some of them will never have conventionally productive or successful lives, but that does not make them disposable. They are beloved children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, siblings, parents, spouses, and friends, full of gifts, talents, love, and the innate value of every human. They deserve every opportunity to reach their potential, and dammit, we as their parents deserve to witness them experiencing joy and the satisfactions of success.

The other issue is the money. Our taxes (and much of ValueOptions® revenue is from taxes) are funding an outrageously top-heavy system. When I visit Pickles at her residential treatment center, I am dismayed at the cafeteria where we visit. It needs a good scrubbing, a fresh coat of paint, and new tables, but the money for cosmetic (they aren’t really cosmetic; an ugly environment is not conducive to emotional well-being) fixes is not often available. The low-level staff is constantly changing because they are overworked, underpaid, and poorly trained, a situation that is brutally difficult for the children and adolescents in their care. In facilities all over the nation, there are staff who are dedicated and caring. They want to do wonderful things for and with children who need treatment, but they do not have the resources to make that happen.

And, of course, many children who need that level of care (and other levels, from acute inpatient to day treatment to intensive therapy that encompasses many hours each week) simply don’t get it because someone in an office somewhere really feels like that child doesn’t need it.

This is no way to run a health care system. This is no way to care for the weak, the vulnerable, and the sick. I invite ValueOptions® to come to the table for a real conversation about real problems and real solutions. Tom Warburton, we see your Kumbaya linking of arms and we raise you one deeply troubled little girl in urgent need of continued services.

 

*A huge thank you to Alena Chandler for her research help.

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11 comments to Value Options and the Denial of Care: Continuing the Conversation About Mental Health Care

  • Christa

    Value Options has discharged my oldest daughter prematurely several times. It’s worth noting that she was discharged the same day she was making homicidal threats because Value Options required it.

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  • Thanks for sharing this information. More people need to see how real people are being treated by these companies.
    Denise recently posted..Violence Is Ugly But Ignoring It Won’t Make It Go Away

  • IMO the biggest failure of the Affordable Care Act is that it didn’t address the power of the insurance companies and their negative impact on the quality of care. DOCTORS, not insurance examiners, should be making decisions about our healthcare with the input from and consideration of the needs of the family being impacted.

    Speaking only for myself, sometimes as the parent of children with mental health issues I deal with feelings of shame and guilt, as if by giving birth to my kids I’ve somehow failed. Being ignored by the healthcare system deepens the shame. Families need support and encouragement and quality service from our medical providers.

    What’s happening to Pickles is a disturbingly perfect example of what’s wrong with our health insurance system.
    Mary Barnmaven Peret recently posted..If wishes were fishes

  • anne

    excellent post, so clear and direct. these crazy value options people better straighten up and fly right!! this poor child – it breaks my heart.
    i wanted to add that not only is the underpaid, overworked, undertrained staff at some of the residential treatment facilities incredibly difficult for our children with severe mental illness – it is not safe. my son was viciously beaten by a psyche aide at an rtf here in ny. i am certain that it was not the first time a staff member lost it with a child at one of these facilities. until we all speak up and speak out things will not change. i have been in continual contact with the office of mental health director for residential care in regard to the horrifying conditions in the 2 facilities my son was in. he is 13 with bipolar disorder among other things.

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  • Wow! Incredibly insightful info. Now i’m saving this webpage at once. Thanks a lot

  • What terrible news. I had no idea something like this was going on. Still make sure you get her treated. Pickles will need all the help she can get.
    Tucker recently posted..Traumatic Brain Injury and SPECT scans

  • Angela

    We have struggled with Value Options over the past year regarding care for our daughter. We had to use use a lawyer, who was very successful, in order to get her the care she needed. Still on that road…we will see what happens.

  • Its even very difficult for me to think about this.

  • Lisa

    We are a military family my daughter is in the same situation . Has anyone had success ? Her life depends on it . Value Options continuously denies claims and appeals NON stop . The Doctors have no power , we were told to get divorced and sign over custody of her to someone else if we wanted her to get the care prescribed by her doctor .

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