People who equate truth with fact are missing the point.

Darkness Is a Cannibal

I remember most of it like snapshots, the way you remember things that happened when you were a very small child.

I remember the police walking up to our door, and why? Could it have been just because my daughter Abbie was at my house and her dad, Robert, was angry about that? It seems unreasonable, but then everything was unreasonable.

I remember opening the door to them, the way they stood back, one on each side of the door, hands hovering over their holstered guns. One officer asked, “Do you have any weapons?” and I answered, “We’re Mennonite,” a ridiculous answer for what felt like a ridiculous question.

I remember my stepson taking his little brother into his room, trying to protect him from seeing police in the house, and is that a memory, or is it a hope? The police said we may not close any doors, and that may be invention, too. I was underwater, breath held, heart paused, and one officer asked Abbie, “Are you OK to be here? Are you safe here?” and she glared (did she?) over his shoulder and said yes, yes, she was safe, she was fine, and they asked to see papers. They wanted to look at papers with signatures and official seals: is she mine? Is this girl flesh of my flesh? Is she my heart, my soul, my waking and dreaming life and all the hopes and heartaches I have lived? Did a judge, a lawyer, some official person declare her to be so?

Many days or weeks before, but maybe after, I called my son Jacob. It was December, his 18th birthday. “I never have to see you again, Mom. I’m never going to talk to you again. I don’t have to anymore and you can’t make me,” and the world was flat and I was flat and you were flat, too, and the phone burned to dust and someone was there, but who? Who was there? Someone held the parts together because the parts stay together and life goes and we are not flat, except we are. We are flat and so very, very sad.

Later, but not much later because I was leaning against the window in my bedroom and the window was very cold, and I rested my forehead against it and felt the coldness and the coldness kept me tethered to the flat, flat world, and Jacob was on the phone, in my ear, and his voice came out to me but it was carrying his father’s words. I don’t know most of the words anymore. I heard them 1,000, or 10,000, or maybe 1,000,000 times, if you count how often I heard them while I slept and when I made dinner and while I drove, but I don’t remember all of them. I heard them on a little silver flip-phone, and over a Palm Centro, and on a Droid X, and on a Samsung Note and occasionally even face to face. I heard them and they stabbed me all over, each one a tiny piercing needle and I cried until I was a husk of corn, stripped, withered, ugly. Wasted. Useless.

I remember walking up the stairs to Robert’s apartment, determined to end the hateful stalemate that was immoveable, static, a mountain or a moon, and I walked up the stairs trembling and I would end it. I would end it if I died. I would end it if he killed me. I hoped he would kill me. I hoped he would kill me 9 times and burn me down, flat me on the flat earth in the emptiness of life without them. I would die, I would hurt and I would die and it would be so right, so holy, a most perfect thing. I would not live without them anymore. I would not look outside to see some official person with a weapon or a clipboard come to decide about me. I would not watch for the cars with the official seals on them because he hoped I would lose not just the two children we shared, but my other children as well. I would not cry myself to sleep Jacob Abbie I want you I miss you life is empty everything hurts come home come home come home to me I love you so much and I’m flat and everything is burning and still I go to the grocery and pay the gas bill and watch cartoons with your brothers and where is the ground? Why does it buck and curl under my feet this way? I can’t love you this way. I can’t. I can’t. I’m flat. We’re all so flat; there’s nothing but the hate he cultivated and the hate has made us all flat.

I remember hearing my husband murmur to our youngest son, “Stay here with me. Mommy has to cry for awhile, but she’ll be OK,” and our little boy’s voice, angry, asking, “Why are they so mean? Why don’t they come back? Don’t they love us?” and I covered my head with pillows.

I remember walking up those apartment stairs the most. Crumbling concrete stairs, itchy gray wool socks on my feet, and a mild Albuquerque winter day, and I knocked on the door. Robert came to the door and I was ready. I would push my way in, force an end, stop the stalemate and surely one of us would die or sleep that night in a jail cell, but I would end it. I would breech this unbreechable thing with a broken jaw or a pair of handcuffs. Finally, I would see it through to the end.

All those times when he sent official people to my door: nod, nod, no sir, no weapons, yes ma’am, we have food in the kitchen, see? No sir, we don’t spank, yes ma’am we have a pediatrician. We are good, do you have that in your official papers? I am their mother, do you see here where the judge signed? Do you see where some official person with an important title said that these are people I have permission to love? Do you see this seal? This date stamp? This envelope, this name, this signature? I have no weapons, nothing useful except this phone, this hateful phone and these ears to hear and these eyes to see and my regret to keep me awake at night.

But the memories. I remember opening the door, so many times. I remember answering the phone. I remember mistakes, recriminations, allegations, and the cold, cold window against my forehead, and the world dark on the other side, and darkness is a cannibal and hate is a ravenous monster and they ate connection, cohesion, coherence, and left me with these snapshots. I moved the mountain. I breeched the unbreechable, and when I celebrate, I also cry, and I am more whole and more broken, both. I read and sleep and walk and wish that Robert could hurt, and pray to forgive. Forgive him, forgive them, forgive the nameless others, forgive me.

Because I always opened the door.

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11 comments to Darkness Is a Cannibal

  • Shawna

    Oh Honey, you have no idea how intimately I know your story. We still do not have any contact with ours other than an uncomfortable visit at Christmas on some years at the grandparents house.
    You are an incredible mother for always opening the door. I know how hard the pull is to just run. Run far and fast and pretend your heart and mind aren’t broken in a trillion unrecoverable pieces.
    You are a warrior. Much love to you.

    • Thank you, Shawna. I’m so so sorry you understand. There’s some comfort in knowing I’m not alone, but even more sadness that others have endured similar. Love and peace to you.

  • I’m sure I’ve read better writing. SURE of it. But I couldn’t tell you when, or whose it was. Cormac McCarthy? Maybe. This is some crazy-well-written anguish, my dear.

    I hope it’s cathartic.
    Jim Walter recently posted..Okay?

  • Wrenching but beautifully writte, Adrienne. You somehow maintain hope in the face of such hurt, and I applaud you. You have endured so much.
    Kristin Shaw recently posted..I Surrender

  • I believe that the truth will out. It may take a while. But a parent who alienates children from another parent can’t keep their motives hidden forever.

    “Any attempt at alienating the children from the other parent should be seen as a direct and willful violation of one of the prime duties of parenthood.” ~J. Michael Bone and Michael R. Walsh

  • Lori

    Oh, love to that woman. This one too, but that one needed mountains and oceans worth and I hate that I can’t give them to her.

  • Stunning.

    I know when I see the kind of writing you can’t really comment on because to try and do so would only dilute the awe you feel upon reading it over and over again, so instead you just shut up because you know better and really, what more is there to say since you said everything there was and then some and I believe the words you strung together will always have a place in my heart because they were seared there the moment I read this post.

    Yeah.
    That.

  • This makes me want to hug you. Oh, the faces. I see the faces, the officials. The deciderers deciding shit that has nothing to do with them but everything to do with them because another person has invoked them, has brought them in, is trying to hurt. And I see your strength. I see your strength in the wake of those faces. I see it.
    Arnebya recently posted..#AskAwayFriday 2

  • Shani

    My heart breaks for you. You are so brave to expose yourself to us like this. I will never forget this.

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